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Social and Policy Issues

As the U.S. Constitution turns 230, the Gallup Vault reviews what Americans thought of the historical document at its bicentennial in 1987.

Days after Princess Diana's death in 1997, 50% of Britons and 27% of Americans were as upset as if someone they knew personally had died.

In 1957, two in three Americans were collecting S&H, Gold Bond or other brands of trading stamps earned by shopping at participating retailers.

Fifty years ago this summer, Gallup asked Americans how concerned they were about racial strife.

In 1993, Americans had a mixed response to easing restrictions on gays serving in the military, and both sides felt strongly about their view.

After mostly disapproving of married women working when not financially necessary in 1936, Americans gave slim majority approval to this in 1969.

In 1939, Gallup conducted simultaneous polls in the U.S. and France on each nation's favorite foreign countries and statesmen. The U.S. led in France, as did FDR.

One of Gallup's earliest polls, from 1939, addressed the evolving cultural norms around men and women revealing their skin in summer clothing.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 50 years ago that state laws against interracial marriage were unconstitutional. But as that case was wending its way through the courts, less than half of Americans agreed.