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State of the Global Workplace 2013

Business Journal

Employers that fail to foster worker engagement risk losing talented employees not only to other New Zealand-based companies, but also to businesses in neighboring Australia.

Business Journal

The country's actively disengaged employees experience work-related anxiety that costs Australia $51 billion (U.S.) annually. Getting those workers to connect their talents with organizational objectives can reduce that stress.

Business Journal

Half of the country's population is under 30. Motivating that group will be vital to Indonesia's economic success in the coming years.

Business Journal

Engaged workplaces are essential to retaining Emiratis in private-sector jobs and meeting other key societal objectives, which include diversifying the country's economy and stemming rising unemployment.

Business Journal

After a 25-year civil war, the country has risen to lower-middle-income status, but it has much more ambitious goals. It won't achieve them without an engaged and productive workforce.

Business Journal

The country has a widening productivity gap versus other G7 nations. Improving employee morale could be the most efficient option for U.K. companies to start closing it.

Business Journal

Brazil's once-rapid growth has slowed considerably, but the country could get a boost if its businesses focus on sustaining and increasing employee engagement levels.

Business Journal

Nearly one-third of the country's employees are actively disengaged, leading to anger, stress, and possibly lost economic growth. Managers play a crucial role in lowering that number.

Business Journal

Only 6% of Chinese employees are engaged in their jobs. Raising that rate -- one of the world's lowest -- would boost productivity and workers' quality of life.

Business Journal

The good news: Employees who are engaged in their jobs can give economies a big boost. The bad news: Only 13% of workers worldwide are engaged.