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Business Journal

What do women and millennials want from the workplace? Gallup.com covered these and other hot topics in 2016.

Business Journal

Women are more engaged at work than men are -- and female managers are better at engaging employees.

Business Journal

No single explanation can account for the differences in men's and women's paychecks, but two reasons stand out.

Business Journal

Though less pronounced than in the past, the gender pay gap still exists and has barely budged in over a decade.

Business Journal

Income is important, but women want more out of a job. They'll shop around for a role that best fits them and their lives.

Business Journal

One factor has the greatest influence on women's decision to stay in the workforce or leave: children.

45% of female employees want to become a senior manager or leader

Twenty percent of U.S. workers say they are making less money than they did five years ago, down from 28% in 2013. Also, 23% say their job does not take full advantage of their skills and training.

Business Journal

A majority of workers would consider leaving for better pay. But high engagement and high well-being can help keep them around.

Business Journal

What are the strengths of salespeople, and how can organizations develop them? What do great sales managers do differently? The authors of Strengths Based Selling tackle these and other matters, including: why money is overrated as a motivator.

Business Journal

Leading economist Alan Krueger argues that companies can get away with paying lower wages than competitors without losing many employees, though there are hidden costs. He also says that organizations are right to keep pay a secret.

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To understand how compensation motivates -- or demotivates -- employees, executives must come to terms with, and learn to manage, the irrational, emotional nature of pay.

Business Journal

Companies can reduce costly churn if managers know what to look for. But they usually don't -- and that's because too many managers think money is at the root of the turnover issue. This article uncovers the real sources of the problem and reveals the reasons most people quit. Find out how to keep good employees from walking out the door.

Business Journal

Upscale clothier Jack Mitchell, author of the bestseller Hug Your Customers and CEO of Mitchells/Richards/Marshs, explains his infectiously enthusiastic approach to management in his latest book, Hug Your People. In this interview, Mitchell tells why positivity is good for productivity and profits.

Business Journal

This element is measured by the statement “In the last six months, someone at work has talked to me about my progress.” Some people think a performance review will suffice. But it’s not nearly enough, write the authors of 12: The Elements of Great Managing.

Business Journal

Contrary to conventional wisdom, job seekers from different generations often look for the same things from prospective employers.

Business Journal

The need to feel a connection to a larger cause is very important to most employees. In fact, believing that "the mission or purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important" is a primary motivator, according to the authors of 12: The Elements of Great Managing.

Business Journal

The competition for quality employees among leading companies is fierce, regardless of industry or sector. Job seekers aren’t looking strictly at salary offers; nor are they putting much stock into added perks such as company fitness center programs or on-site daycare services. According to new Gallup research, what they want most -- along with competitive pay, of course -- is quality management.

Business Journal

Employees may be motivated by many different things, but they all strive for recognition and praise. And they need that positive feedback at least every seven days, according to the authors of 12: The Elements of Great Managing -- a New York Times bestseller that draws on 10 million workplace interviews.