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Gallup Vault

As Hawaii residents recover from a false nuclear attack warning, Gallup revisits Americans' fears of the atomic bomb during the Cold War in 1951.

As Congress crafted the 1965 bill that revolutionized U.S. immigration policy and launched "chain migration," Gallup found Americans open to the change.

Across 100 pieces published thus far, the Gallup Vault revisits historical Gallup data that help put the past and present into better perspective.

In 1952, Gallup asked Americans what kind of job or occupation would provide women the best chance of finding a husband. Office jobs came out on top.

Leading up to passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, few Americans thought it would improve the economy, cut their taxes or simplify their filing.

Americans in 1947 broadly supported a U.N. plan to partition the British Mandate for Palestine into two states -- one Arab, one Jewish.

FDR's decision to make Thanksgiving a week earlier in 1939 was a public relations turkey, with Republicans and Democrats holding opposing views.

Eighty years ago, just over half of Americans thought a girl needed to be 18 to marry, but 22% put the number under 18 and 25% over 18.

During National Epilepsy Awareness Month, the Gallup Vault shows that the American public's views about epilepsy have come a long way.

Right at the start, a majority of Americans suspected there was more to John F. Kennedy's assassination than met the eye.

After the worst one-day decline in U.S. history -- "Black Monday" in October 1987 -- Americans were unclear on why the stock market had unraveled.

In 1953, Gallup found 69% of Americans in favor of adding the words "under God" to the Pledge of Allegiance, while 21% were opposed.

Public unease with the pace of racial integration grew after President John F. Kennedy used federal troops to enforce a black man's right to attend Ole Miss.

As the U.S. Constitution turns 230, the Gallup Vault reviews what Americans thought of the historical document at its bicentennial in 1987.

Americans opposed a pardon for Richard Nixon in 1974, but a decade later they said President Gerald Ford had done the right thing in granting it.

Days after Princess Diana's death in 1997, 50% of Britons and 27% of Americans were as upset as if someone they knew personally had died.

In 1957, two in three Americans were collecting S&H, Gold Bond or other brands of trading stamps earned by shopping at participating retailers.

Despite facing stiffer resistance from North Korea than expected at the start of the Korean War, Americans rejected using the atom bomb in August 1950.

Fifty years ago this summer, Gallup asked Americans how concerned they were about racial strife.

In 1947, as the Iron Curtain was descending on Europe, Gallup found most Americans suspicious of Russia's military and cultural intentions.