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Health

Explore Gallup's research.

American workers are growing less concerned about being exposed to the coronavirus at work, but the issue is still relevant as one in four workers remain worried.

Twenty-eight percent of Americans say they are "very" or "somewhat worried" they will get COVID-19 -- the lowest percentage Gallup has recorded since the summer of 2021.

Americans' optimism about the COVID-19 situation in the U.S. has rebounded after falling precipitously in July, and 44% now believe the pandemic is over.

Results from the first round of the Global Diet Quality Project survey offer a lens into the ways diets around the world are unhealthy and where they are unhealthy.

Download the West Health-Gallup 2022 Healthcare in America Report to learn about the shortfalls of America's healthcare system.

Results from the 2021 Hologic Global Women's Health Index survey in Afghanistan show millions of Afghan women are not getting the preventive healthcare they need.

A new multicountry Gallup study shows many people see the harm from noncommunicable diseases such as cancer, but they underestimate the risks people face from others.

Download the data to learn how people perceive noncommunicable diseases in five countries around the world.

Download the Western Governors University 25th Anniversary Impact Report

Download the Western Governors University 2021 Alumni Survey report

One in seven U.S. parents of children under age 5 (14%) have gotten their child vaccinated against COVID-19, while another 29% intend to do so.

Americans' support for COVID-19 vaccine mandates ranges from 48% for elementary students to 54% for college students. Parents largely oppose them.

Sharply fewer U.S. adults now (41%) than in April (63%) say the COVID-19 situation is getting better.

Broad majorities of Americans believe the use of alcohol adversely affects society and drinkers themselves. Two-thirds of U.S. adults continue to imbibe.

Cookpad's latest global report on home cooking trends sheds light on the important relationship between home cooking and people's lives, but more research is needed to understand it fully.

One-third of Americans think the pandemic is over, and a majority say their lives are at least somewhat back to normal. Most expect COVID-19-related disruptions in society to continue through the end of the year or longer.

Download Law School in a Pandemic, Year 2: Moving From Emergency Remote Teaching to Emerging Best Practices in Distance Legal Education

Americans are about evenly divided on whether the government should require passengers to wear face masks on airplanes.

The steady increase in COVID-19 cases this past month is not disconcerting to Americans, as they are less worried now about the coronavirus than they were at the start of the year, and fewer are social distancing.