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Gallup Blog

Explore Gallup's research.

by Jon Clifton

Unemployment doesn't tell us much about a country's prosperity or economic growth. At best, the current metric gives us an incomplete picture. It's time to retire it.

by Kristjan Archer

Gallup breaks down five major issues on Britons' minds ahead of their high-stakes election on Thursday and where the two major parties stand.

by Lydia Saad

As leaders gather for NATO's 70-year anniversary, Gallup reviews its archives for insights on what Americans think about the longtime defense pact.

by Justin McCarthy

Gallup will release the findings of its annual Health and Healthcare survey in the coming weeks.

by RJ Reinhart

On World Children's Day, perceptions that children are treated with respect vary widely around the globe.

by Mohamed Younis

As election season approaches, Gallup releases its campaign 2020 page and Metrics that Matter interactive, featuring the most important trends to follow when putting this contest into perspective.

By Lance Stevens and Andrew Dugan

Does having access to scientific knowledge lead to people feeling more included in its benefits? The Wellcome Global Monitor survey indicates so.

by Julie Ray

Afghanistan sits alone at the bottom of Gallup's Law and Order Index rankings with a score of 38 in 2018, the deadliest year for its civilians in a decade.

by Julie Ray

A new report from Lloyd's Register Foundation and Gallup finds that globally, safety and risk data in general are patchy -- if these data exist at all.

by Lydia Saad

Teachers who foster creativity, especially those who leverage technology, are more likely to view their students as capable, engaged learners.

by Lydia Saad

As Republican leaders lean on Democrats to approve the USMCTA, recent Gallup data on trade provide insights on the public opinion backdrop.

by Jihad Fakhreddine

When your country leads the world in government corruption and it's always a bad time to find a job, even the slightest push can send it into turmoil.

by Lydia Saad

Securing the top spot for the presidential nomination early in the campaign has been the exception for Democrats over the past 60 years.

by RJ Reinhart and Zacc Ritter

There is a disconnect between Americans' perceptions of their personal success and their perceptions of how society defines success.

by Zacchary Ritter and Priscilla Standridge

Americans' interactions with local news vary significantly. Greater interaction is associated with slightly higher levels of consuming and trust in local news.

by Jeffrey M. Jones

Americans believe it is a good idea for journalists to interact with their audiences on social media but not to express their opinions on the news.

by Andrew Dugan and Steve Crabtree

Most people worldwide say the work that scientists do benefits people like them. However, considerably fewer say scientists' work benefits most others.

by Shane Pruitt and Ben Regan

American Indian degree-holders in the U.S. who are graduates of Tribal Colleges and Universities outpace all other graduates of higher education institutions in being engaged in their work and in their communities.

by Jon Clifton

Through Afghanistan's presidential election in late September, Gallup will be publishing a new story every week on how Afghans' lives are going.

by Lydia Saad

Fifty years after Woodstock became the symbol of 1960s social upheaval, Gallup trends highlight how much has changed in U.S. society.