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Race Relations

Explore Gallup's research.

The first question Gallup asked about race or racism came amid a high-profile stance against discrimination from first lady Eleanor Roosevelt in 1939.

by Lydia Saad

Fifty years after Woodstock became the symbol of 1960s social upheaval, Gallup trends highlight how much has changed in U.S. society.

by Frank Newport

Reparations may become a significant issue in the 2020 presidential campaign, played out in the context of black dissatisfaction with society's treatment.

Martin Luther King Jr. advocated nonviolent tactics to advance civil rights. But in the early 1960s, Americans viewed these tactics differently.

Although still mostly positive, the percentages of Americans saying blacks are on par with whites in obtaining jobs is the lowest since Dr. Martin Luther King's era.

Congress has never made lynching a federal crime, but Americans have long supported the passage of such a bill.

Following the 1968 Kerner Commission report on racial tension, Gallup found whites and blacks agreeing on some conclusions and disagreeing on others.

Across 100 pieces published thus far, the Gallup Vault revisits historical Gallup data that help put the past and present into better perspective.