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Race Relations

Explore Gallup's research.

Social & Policy Issues

Ninety-four percent of U.S. adults now approve of marriages between Black people and White people. Just 4% approved when Gallup first asked the question in 1958.

Americans' satisfaction with the direction of the U.S. has dropped to 23%, while mentions of COVID-19 as the nation's top problem surge.

Social & Policy Issues

Most Black and Hispanic Americans do not have a preference when asked which term they would rather people use to describe their racial group.

Social & Policy Issues

Americans have become less confident in recent years that equality exists for Black people in housing or jobs and, perhaps as a result, they are more supportive of affirmative action. But racial gaps in perceptions persist.

Social & Policy Issues

Americans' satisfaction with the way society treats Asian people has fallen sharply this year, after a series of violent attacks on Asian Americans.

by Camille Lloyd

As the Gallup Center on Black Voices celebrates its one-year anniversary, here is what we learned in our first year of research.

Social & Policy Issues

Thirty-five percent of Black Americans reported being treated unfairly while shopping recently, the highest in Gallup's trend. Reports of unfair treatment in other situations are steady rather than declining.

Social & Policy Issues

Sixty-four percent of Americans say racism against Black people is widespread in the U.S., a new high in Gallup's trend. The majority of U.S. adults remain dissatisfied with how Black people are treated.

Social & Policy Issues

U.S. adults' positive ratings of relations between Black and White Americans are at their lowest point in more than two decades of measurement.

by Justin McCarthy

The Gallup Center on Black Voices will report findings on the state of race relations in the U.S.

Social & Policy Issues

Black Americans' confidence in the police remains low, but it has mostly recovered from the drop seen last year after the death of George Floyd.

Americans' mentions of COVID-19 as the most important U.S. problem have fallen to the lowest point since the pandemic began, but government remains a top concern.

As the date approaches this year, just over a third of Americans report having a lot (12%) or some knowledge (25%) about the "Juneteenth" celebration.

Americans continue to be more focused on race-related concerns a year after George Floyd's death on May 25, 2020, than they were before it.

Mentions of COVID-19 as the most important problem in the U.S. have fallen to their lowest point since the start of the pandemic. The percentages naming immigration and race relations are up since last month.

Gallup's update on Americans' worry about a host of national problems finds big changes in concerns about hunger, homelessness and race relations.

Americans' belief that race relations is the top problem facing the country remains higher at the start of 2021 than it was before George Floyd's death and the subsequent protests that galvanized a racial justice movement.