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Gallup Vault

Explore Gallup's research.

A majority of Americans in 1962 backed a U.S. woman's decision to have an abortion in Sweden after she took a drug known to cause birth defects.

Before his assassination, RFK was popular and faring well in polls, but he was not a shoo-in for the Democratic nomination or the presidency.

Before he was killed, Martin Luther King Jr. declared the nation "sick," tying this to racism and violence. Nevertheless, 58% of Americans disagreed.

In 1981, Americans rated faithfulness as the top feature of a successful marriage. Political agreement and having the same social background ranked last.

In November 1936, a month before King Edward VIII of England abdicated to marry an American divorcee, a majority of Americans favored the union.

Congress has never made lynching a federal crime, but Americans have long supported the passage of such a bill.

Americans were split on how the House Un-American Activities Committee handled its hearings, but leaned toward punishing those who didn't cooperate.

Thirty years ago, Gallup found fewer than one in two Americans (38%) favored the death penalty for persons convicted of dealing drugs but not of murder.

U.S. college students, especially those in the East, outpaced the general public in opposing Richard Nixon's policies on the Vietnam War.

Following the 1968 Kerner Commission report on racial tension, Gallup found whites and blacks agreeing on some conclusions and disagreeing on others.

In 2000, half of Americans lacked a cellphone and about half of these said they had no intention of ever getting one.

In 1988, 82% of South Koreans, more than residents of eight other nations, thought the Olympics promote good relations between participant countries.

At the outbreak of World War II, Americans had less than full confidence in the news coming from Europe.

Public support for Nixon's impeachment rose after he fired two attorneys general to ensure the dismissal of the Watergate special prosecutor.

As Hawaii residents recover from a false nuclear attack warning, Gallup revisits Americans' fears of the atomic bomb during the Cold War in 1951.

As Congress crafted the 1965 bill that revolutionized U.S. immigration policy and launched "chain migration," Gallup found Americans open to the change.

Across 100 pieces published thus far, the Gallup Vault revisits historical Gallup data that help put the past and present into better perspective.

In 1952, Gallup asked Americans what kind of job or occupation would provide women the best chance of finding a husband. Office jobs came out on top.

Leading up to passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, few Americans thought it would improve the economy, cut their taxes or simplify their filing.