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Foreign Affairs

Explore Gallup's research.

by Megan Brenan

Gallup takes a look back at how Osama bin Laden's death affected attitudes about U.S. leadership and terrorism.

by RJ Reinhart

U.S. President Joe Biden and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga will hold their first in-person summit on Friday, at a time when 84% of Americans have a positive view of Japan.

Americans consider cyberterrorism and the development of nuclear weapons by North Korea and Iran to be the most critical of 11 potential threats to the U.S.

Americans continue to view Israel favorably and the Palestinian Authority unfavorably, but the Palestinians' image has improved, and more Americans -- particularly Democrats -- want increased pressure on Israel to achieve peace.

Americans' perceptions of China as their country's greatest enemy hit a new high; a record 63% see China's economic power as a critical threat to U.S. vital interests.

Nearly six in 10 Americans think President Joe Biden is respected by world leaders, but fewer, 49%, think the U.S. is viewed favorably on the world stage, and 37% are satisfied with the United States' position in the world.

When Winston Churchill delivered his famous "Iron Curtain" speech 75 years ago, Americans were reluctant to form a military alliance with the U.K. and were unsure of how to respond to Russia's postwar moves.

Two-thirds of Americans approve of President Joe Biden's handling of the coronavirus response, while smaller majorities approve of his overall job performance and his handling of the economy and foreign affairs.

by V. Lance Tarrance

The presidential candidates are delivering potent messages about China and Russia, reminding their respective base voters what's at stake in November.