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Religion

Explore Gallup's research.

by Justin McCarthy

Gallup findings over the past decade reveal that the years from 2010 to 2019 encompassed some revolutionary changes in public opinion.

Christmas is everywhere you turn during the holiday season, but is it for everyone?

Measuring Americans' faith in God depends on the threshold of "belief."

by Frank Newport

Americans of all ages are now more likely to have no formal religion. This is strongest among millennials, though they grow more religious as they age.

by Frank Newport

American Jews remain both strongly Democratic in their political orientation and highly supportive of Israel.

by Frank Newport

Highly religious Americans are less likely than others to drink alcohol and are more likely to view drinking as morally unacceptable.

Four in 10 Americans have a creationist view of human origins, while 33% believe humans evolved with God's guidance and 22% without it.

by Frank Newport

Declining confidence in organized religion likely reflects many factors, including clergy scandals and the religion-politics connection.

by Frank Newport

Pete Buttigieg raised the possibility of a "religious left" in the coming presidential election, but relatively few liberals or Democrats are highly religious.

by Frank Newport

Trump job approval among highly religious, white Protestants is high and has remained stable since he took office.

by Frank Newport

Highly religious Americans, Jews and evangelical Protestants remain much more sympathetic to Israel than others in the U.S.

Prior to recent discussion of a possible Jewish backlash against the Democratic Party, 16% of American Jews identified as Republicans in 2018.