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Abortion

Explore Gallup's research.

Americans' personal religiosity is significantly related to their abortion attitudes, even after controlling for religious and political identity and other demographic variables.

Americans' satisfaction with a variety of aspects of U.S. life and public policy areas remains depressed from 2020, with many declining further since 2021.

Americans' satisfaction with the nation's abortion policies is at a two-decade low of 24%, while the percentage who are dissatisfied because they believe the laws are too strict is at a high of 30%.

This page provides Gallup's long-term trends on Americans' views about abortion by party identification, including views on the legality of abortion and self-identification as pro-choice or pro-life.

Americans' 2018-2021 preferences for the legality of abortion are provided here in tabular form, with breakouts by key population subgroups.

This page outlines Gallup's long-term trends on Americans' views about abortion by gender.

This page provides Gallup's long-term trends on Americans' views about abortion by age, including their views on legality and their preferred label.

Americans' 2018-2021 views on the morality of abortion are provided here in tabular form, with breakouts by key population subgroups.

Americans' identification in 2018-2021 as "pro-choice" or "pro-life" on abortion is provided here in tabular form, with breakouts by key population subgroups.

Gallup data since 2011 indicate that Texas residents' views on abortion closely mirror those of residents in solidly Republican states.

Americans are divided in their views of the morality of changing one's gender, with 51% saying it is morally wrong and 46% saying it is morally acceptable.

Nearly six in 10 Americans oppose overturning Roe v. Wade, similar to their stance since 1989. Laws banning abortion after 18 weeks, in the case of fetal disability or once a heartbeat is detected, also spark majority opposition.

A record-high 47% of U.S. adults think abortion is morally acceptable, while 46% believe it is morally wrong. U.S. adults are also split in their self-identification as "pro-life" or "pro-choice."

Most Americans favor abortion being legal to some degree, but there is wide disagreement about the extent.

Black Americans have become more liberal on abortion rights, but they remain less so than is the case among Democrats overall.

Nearly half of U.S. adults say abortion will be one of many important factors in their vote for a candidate for a major office, 25% do not consider it a key issue and 24% say they will vote only for a candidate who shares their views.

Americans' views on abortion have been stable over the past year, with the public remaining closely divided on the issue: 48% call themselves "pro-choice," and 46% say they are "pro-life."

Fifty years after Woodstock became the symbol of 1960s social upheaval, Gallup trends highlight how much has changed in U.S. society.