skip to main content

Polling Matters

Explore Gallup's research.

by Frank Newport

Highly religious Americans, Jews and evangelical Protestants remain much more sympathetic to Israel than others in the U.S.

by Frank Newport

Proposals to enlarge the role of government in the U.S. seemingly conflict with Americans' deep distrust of the way their government operates.

by Frank Newport

Reparations may become a significant issue in the 2020 presidential campaign, played out in the context of black dissatisfaction with society's treatment.

by Frank Newport

Candidates' proposals to increase taxes on the wealthy are not new, but do generally resonate with American public opinion.

by V. Lance Tarrance

Decades of intellectual debate about American power sunsetting seems lost on a public that views the matter through a partisan lens.

by Frank Newport

Gallup reviews how well public opinion fits with the bipartisan committee's recommendations on border security, immigration and spending.

by Jeffrey M. Jones

Historically, presidents' approval ratings have not increased after State of the Union addresses, but there have been modest upticks after the past three.

by Frank Newport

Americans' views on the state of the union are a moving target as the nation waits to see if the government shutdown is permanently resolved.

by Frank Newport

The border debate pits the two issues Americans name as the country's most important problems, government and immigration, against one another.

by V. Lance Tarrance

In early November, about one in six Americans approved of Trump on the economy but not on healthcare. Addressing their concerns could have helped the GOP electorally.

by Jeffrey M. Jones

By many measures, President Trump's job approval ratings have shown the most stability of any president.

by Frank Newport, Lydia Saad and Jeffrey M. Jones

Gallup's editors review six factors that help explain Tuesday's midterm results, ranging from President Trump's impact to the economy and voter engagement.

by Frank Newport

Despite the partisan rancor surrounding the midterm campaign, majorities agree on several things the government can do regardless of who wins on Nov. 6.

by Frank Newport

American public opinion on affirmative action in college admissions is complex, with the public supporting the idea in theory, but opposing the use of race and ethnicity as a factor in admissions decisions.

by Frank Newport

Given a choice, Americans are significantly more likely to want political leaders in Washington to compromise rather than stick to principles.

by Frank Newport

Asked to define socialism, 24% of Americans mention "equality," while 17% say it is government ownership of the means of production.

by V. Lance Tarrance

Competing factors for the midterms are presidential approval, which would imply GOP losses, and economic sentiment, which would suggest GOP gains.

by Frank Newport

Church attendance has been edging down in the U.S., and a decline in "outstanding" local church leaders could be a factor.

by Frank Newport

American Catholics, about 23% of the U.S. adult population, remained positive about Pope Francis in early August, giving him a 78% favorable rating.

by Frank Newport

Some Americans may literally define the "working class" as those who are working, rather than as a position in the socioeconomic hierarchy.