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Manager Profiles

Explore Gallup's research.

It's the Manager gives CHROs and CEOs step-by-step instructions on how to create a culture of development within their organization. Gallup has learned that development is the most important part of a job for millennials, Gen Z and the workforce of the future. It's the Manager helps managers get the training and tools they need to become successful managers.

CHROs and CEOs must think about the right way to develop managers to create a culture of development for their employees. It's the Manager provides leaders with training, strengths-based development and the tools needed to train better managers.

To attract and hire top talent companies need to not only create a workplace tailored to today's workforce, but train and develop managers that will deliver on the company's brand promise from the job interview, to onboarding, to development and through the exit interview.

Learn how to handle the workforce issues of tomorrow like managing matrixed teams, remote workers, flex time, cultural diversity, millennials, Gen Z, AI and how technology will affect the workplace.

To be a better manager you first must stop acting like a boss and start thinking like a coach. Learn to become the kind of manager who focuses on developing the people in today's workforce.

Featured Book

It's the Manager equips your managers with 52 of Gallup's greatest discoveries from decades of research into the science of management.

"It's the Manager" gives human resource leaders access to Gallup's platform where managers can do surveys, developmental reviews, check the strengths and engagement of their employees and further their manager development and training.

Business Journal

Almost daily, companies are cutting workers, and morale and productivity are suffering as a result. In this environment, a strengths-based approach is vital because it creates hope, opens the doors to untapped potential, and brings out the best in people and in companies.

Business Journal

Why are mentors such a powerful influence on their protégés? "Human see; human do" is a fundamental part of our wiring, write the authors of the New York Times bestseller 12: The Elements of Great Managing.

Business Journal

Why does it matter so much to employees that someone at work cares about them? It's because their need for bonding extends far beyond their homes, churches, and neighborhoods, according to the authors of the New York Times bestseller 12: The Elements of Great Managing.

Business Journal

Nearly one quarter of U.S. employees -- and 51% of actively disengaged workers -- would sack their managers if given the chance, according to the latest GMJ survey. Engaged employees, however, are far more charitable to their supervisors.

Business Journal

Many managers dread having to give performance reviews, and many employees equally dread receiving them. A manager in Belgium, one of the highest rated supervisors in Gallup's global database, has solved this problem by not making such a big deal about the reviews. Rather, he gives his workers insightful and personal feedback throughout the year. This approach has proven very effective for his team and has earned the veteran manager accolades. Would his approach work for you?

Business Journal

The ramifications of matching employees to what they naturally do best are profound. So much so that this aspect of work life emerged as one the elements that best predict the performance of an employee or team. The authors of the New York Times bestseller 12: The Elements of Great Managing explain.

Business Journal

A Cargill manager's employees rate him exceptionally high on a crucial aspect of great management: developing his team. His leadership practices, which he says he learned as a teen, offer lessons to managers across all industries, according to the authors of the New York Times bestseller 12: The Elements of Great Managing.

Business Journal

A manager at Owens Corning's Rio Claro, Brazil, facility knows that equipping his employees with what they need leads to many benefits, not the least of which is worker safety, comfort, and productivity. But it also instills team spirit. In fact, the Rio Claro facility is emblematic of one of the key elements revealed in the recently published New York Times bestseller, 12: The Elements of Great Managing.

Business Journal

To decrease wait times at a prestigious Toronto hospital, a manager needed a clear picture of how friction between two teams was decreasing employee engagement. Ensuring that employees knew that their opinions matter was the key to improving performance.

Business Journal

The young manager of a home improvement store in Wales excels by giving his employees opportunities at work to learn and grow. In fact, he does this so well that he has become one of the most successful managers at it in Gallup's worldwide database.

Business Journal

This manager in India was faced with a poor-performing team and tremendous pressure to turn it around. To tackle this pressing problem, he took a surprising and totally unconventional approach: He fostered workplace friendships.

Business Journal

In this German plant, the responsibility for fixing a major manufacturing problem fell to manager Klaus Welte. He needed to assemble his team in the same way as the product -- each employee had to fit in his role and work flawlessly together with the rest. The failure of any one component, or any team member, would cause the product and the entire group to fall short of their goals. Here's how Welte and his team overcame a high-pressure challenge.