skip to main content

Consumers

Explore Gallup's research.

More Americans than just two months ago are experiencing financial hardship from rising gas prices. Meanwhile, their view of the economy keeps worsening.

Nearly three in five U.S. adults, up from 39% in 2015, believe they spend too much time on their smartphone. The increase was about equal by gender and age, though younger adults continue to be much more likely to say this.

Inflation has become Americans' top concern, both nationally and in terms of their personal financial situation. What they want to do about it is less clear.

Americans' already-low economic confidence fell further in May.

For the first time in Gallup's trend dating back to 1978, less than half of Americans, 30%, say it is a good time to buy a house.

Significantly fewer Americans now than a year ago rate their personal finances positively as a record-high mention inflation as the top financial problem facing their family.

Sharply more Americans than a year ago worry a great deal about the availability and affordability of energy and describe the U.S. energy situation as very serious.

Seventy-nine percent of U.S. adults expect inflation to go up over the next six months, including 50% who say it will go up a lot.

U.S. adults on average read 12.6 books in 2021, three fewer books than in the prior measurement from 2016.

Fewer Americans traveled by air in 2021 than before the pandemic, and those who traveled averaged fewer trips. The decline in air travel since 2015 was only among employed adults; there was no change among nonemployed adults.

Portending solid holiday retail sales, Americans expect to spend an average $886 on gifts this season, slightly more than a year ago. Most people didn't start shopping early, but when they do shop, it's likely to be online.

The amount Americans estimate they will spend on Christmas gifts this year roughly matches what they estimated last year around the same time, but it is still lower than before the pandemic.

Most Americans have personally had difficulty getting products they've ordered or wanted to order in the past two months, with 71% experiencing a shipment delay, product unavailability or both.

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way Americans get food, as several significant shifts have emerged since 2019.

Half of Americans say they are completely or mostly isolating from people outside their household, up from 38% last month and the highest level since May.

Americans' estimate of the amount they will spend on gifts this holiday season is up slightly from October, portending an average year for holiday sales.

The prospect of a new stimulus payment increases the likelihood that Americans will spend as much as or more this holiday season than they did last year. This effect is greatest among those who believe COVID-19 is getting worse.

Americans expect to spend an average $805 on Christmas gifts this year, down sharply from $942 last year at this time and the lowest October spending estimate since 2016.

Americans who are confident they can protect themselves from COVID-19 are more likely to visit stores and other public places. Mask mandates are among several factors linked to higher confidence.