skip to main content

Crime

Explore Gallup's research.

Eight in 10 Americans say they worry about crime and violence in the U.S. a great deal (53%) or a fair amount (27%).

Americans' satisfaction with a variety of aspects of U.S. life and public policy areas remains depressed from 2020, with many declining further since 2021.

Nearly one in three Americans (32%) say that drug use has been a cause of trouble in their family.

Americans' worry about becoming a victim of 13 crimes is trending upward this year after edging mostly downward in 2020.

Americans' view that local crime has gotten worse in the past year has jumped 13 percentage points to 51%, the highest in over a decade.

U.S. household crime victimization rates remain lower than they were between 2009 and 2016, but they are not as low as in 2020.

Fifty-five percent of Americans favor the death penalty for convicted murderers, marking the fourth consecutive year below 60%. Support has not been lower since 1972.

A dwindling percentage of U.S. adults say the criminal justice system is "not tough enough" (41%), while an expanded 21% say it is "too tough" and 35% maintain it is "about right."

Americans are more likely to perceive crime in the U.S. as having increased over the prior year (78%) than they have been at any point since 1993.

New lows in Gallup's 20-year trend say someone in their household (20%) or they, personally (13%), have been a crime victim in the past year.

A record-high 68% of Americans support legalizing marijuana, including majorities of most demographic groups.

Among fragile community residents, 43% say they know "some" or "a lot" of people who have been treated unfairly by the police.

Learn what percentage of Americans have been victimized by any of seven types of conventional crime in the past year, and what the rate is for violent crime.