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Gallup Panel

Explore Gallup's research.

Substantial numbers of Americans aged 50 and older sacrifice basic needs and skip necessary treatment because of high healthcare costs.

K-12 workers in the U.S. are more likely than workers in all other industries to say they feel burned out at work.

Social & Policy Issues

Two years after George Floyd's murder by Minneapolis police, half of Americans (50%) support "major changes" to policing in the U.S., and another 39% favor "minor changes."

One-third of Americans think the pandemic is over, and a majority say their lives are at least somewhat back to normal. Most expect COVID-19-related disruptions in society to continue through the end of the year or longer.

When recognition is inequitable, the consequences are far-reaching. See how equitable recognition makes for better work -- and a better workplace.

Americans are about evenly divided on whether the government should require passengers to wear face masks on airplanes.

Banking customers expect quality conversations around complex problems, digital fluency and trusted advice. Banks that can scale conversation quality will engage their customers and grow.

A majority of German workers who saw wrongdoing at work in the past 12 months kept silent. See what managers can do to foster a culture of ethics.

One in four U.S. employees say they have been recruited in the past three months, and the impact is lasting. See what leaders can do to retain talent.

Gallup research shows how the four dynamics of hybrid teams should change the way we lead. Consider these when designing your hybrid workplace.

Workers who suffer poor sleep quality report higher levels of unplanned absenteeism, costing U.S. employers an estimated $44 billion annually.

Fewer than one in four U.S. employees feel strongly that their organization cares about their wellbeing -- the lowest percentage in nearly a decade.

After stepping up their social distancing in January, fewer Americans took these precautions in February as worry about the pandemic lessened.

As COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations and deaths decline, Americans' view of the pandemic is vastly improved, and they are significantly less worried about contracting the virus.

The pandemic disproportionately caused strain on women. The reasons why are too big to ignore. Here's how leaders can help.

Attract and hire more women to your organization by discovering the differentiators between what women and men want in their next job.

Get your DEI efforts in line by asking these five questions and taking the right actions in response.

Wellbeing and DEI stagnate when treated as separate initiatives. Read why -- and how -- the two must work together for your organization to thrive.

Black and Hispanic adults are more stressed than White adults about catching COVID-19 and more worried about unequal healthcare access.

Black adults living in households with lower incomes report higher levels of wellbeing than do their White or Hispanic counterparts, but this fades in higher-income households.