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K-12

Explore Gallup's research.

A newly released Amazon Future Engineer/Gallup Student Study finds that role models for students are important to inspiring long-term interest in a computer science career.

More than three in five U.S. students in grades five through 12, 62%, are interested in learning computer science, however significantly fewer, 49%, have taken such a course at their school.

Over half of parents with children under 12 say they would get their child vaccinated against the coronavirus if such a vaccine were available.

Just under half of U.S. K-12 parents support universal masking in schools for both students and teachers. Significant proportions favor no masking at all.

Nearly three-quarters of Americans remain satisfied with the quality of their oldest child's education, although they are less satisfied than they were before the pandemic began.

Nearly three-quarters of Americans remain satisfied with the quality of their oldest child's education, although they are less satisfied than they were before the pandemic began.

Majorities of Americans support mask mandates for unvaccinated students, teachers and staff members, as well as vaccine mandates for middle and high school students. K-12 parents are less supportive.

Majorities of Americans favor requiring students to be vaccinated, ranging from 51% for middle school students to 61% for college students.

Understand American parents' thoughts on the postsecondary pathways they aspire to for their children – rather than only those they feel are within reach – as well as the barriers they face to these aspirations. Download the report.

by Stephanie Marken

Although demand for computer scientists remains high, women remain significantly underrepresented in the field. Early exposure to CS education is critical to improving the rate of girls who consider it as an academic and career path.

About eight in 10 parents of K-12 students in the U.S. support providing in-person school in their communities right now for elementary and secondary students.

In a new study of high school students in Massachusetts, 50% say they prefer full-time, in-person learning, while 16% prefer learning remotely full-time. Low-income students are most likely to be learning remotely full-time, at 57%.

Less than half of parents with children learning remotely full time or part time (47%) are currently working full time, vs. 71% of those with kids learning in-person full time.

Analytics and advice to create an engaging and inclusive workplace for educators.

Support student wellbeing and engagement for short- and long-term success.

Improve organizational and student outcomes by focusing on employee engagement.

Discover how Greater St. Albert Catholic Schools uses a strengths-based approach to engage teachers, students and parents.

Almost half of parents are very worried that their child will contract COVID-19 at school, and about a third prefer that their child's school offer full-time remote learning.

Addressing problems head-on can help stressed education leaders build coping mechanisms that promote long-term wellbeing.