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Public Opinion

Explore Gallup's research.

Get data and insights on people's negative and positive daily experiences that can help leaders understand how to increase emotional health in society.

Understand American parents' thoughts on the postsecondary pathways they aspire to for their children – rather than only those they feel are within reach – as well as the barriers they face to these aspirations. Download the report.

Gallup -- like many other researchers -- uses cognitive interviewing, as well as several other tools, to ensure the questions it is going to ask are clear and easy to answer, and measure what they are supposed to.

Gallup recently tested the value of including Quick Response Codes in survey invitations.

Gallup and Walk Free developed a methodology to estimate the prevalence of modern slavery using an innovative modeling approach.

Cellphone scamming and blocking technologies present a new challenge to survey researchers.

Researchers who are considering mixing survey research modes or contemplating a transition to a new method should be especially mindful of mode effects.

Telephone survey response rates are down across the survey research industry, requiring researchers to explore alternatives that supplement phone surveys.

Across 100 pieces published thus far, the Gallup Vault revisits historical Gallup data that help put the past and present into better perspective.

Survey respondents probed after an initial "don't know/refused" response give systematically different answers than those not probed for a response.

Text messaging is widely used in the U.S., but it appears to have significant drawbacks as a primary way to reach survey respondents.

Hear directly from Gallup's methodologists about our latest experiments and recommendations for conducting public opinion research.

by Frank Newport

Find out which of President-elect Trump's proposals are in sync with American public opinion, which are not and which fall in the middle.

by Frank Newport

Hillary Clinton's margin over Donald Trump in the national popular vote will be close to two percentage points, making the 3.3-point Clinton margin in the pre-election national poll average remarkably accurate.