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Religion and Social Trends

Explore Gallup's research.

by Frank Newport

Several factors help explain why Americans are four times as likely to see polygamy as morally acceptable now compared with 14 years ago.

by Frank Newport

More Americans say religion is increasing its influence on American life, although there has been no uptick in individual religiosity.

by Frank Newport

New data show little evidence of major change in the percentage of Americans worshipping during the virus situation, although most now worship virtually.

by Frank Newport

The COVID-19 virus has disrupted traditional religious practices in the U.S. and may deepen spirituality among Americans as they confront the crisis.

Christmas is everywhere you turn during the holiday season, but is it for everyone?

by Frank Newport

Americans of all ages are now more likely to have no formal religion. This is strongest among millennials, though they grow more religious as they age.

by Lydia Saad

Fifty years after Woodstock became the symbol of 1960s social upheaval, Gallup trends highlight how much has changed in U.S. society.

by Frank Newport

Declining confidence in organized religion likely reflects many factors, including clergy scandals and the religion-politics connection.

Prior to recent discussion of a possible Jewish backlash against the Democratic Party, 16% of American Jews identified as Republicans in 2018.

by Frank Newport

Americans' identification as born-again or evangelical has stayed remarkably stable since 1991, even as other indicators show Americans becoming less religious.