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Religion and Social Trends

Explore Gallup's research.

Americans' personal religiosity is significantly related to their abortion attitudes, even after controlling for religious and political identity and other demographic variables.

About three in four Americans have a religious preference, but less than half say that religion is "very important" to them, that they belong to a church or that they regularly attend religious services.

Find out more about recent research on Americans' religious behavior in a time of significant change.

Americans have increasingly abandoned traditional values norms and are increasingly critical of major societal institutions, raising questions about the future.

Southern Baptists, meeting in Nashville for their annual convention, remain the largest Protestant denomination in the U.S.

Twenty percent of Americans report they have attended a church, synagogue, mosque or temple in person in the past week. Another 10% say they attended remotely.

The coronavirus pandemic has had little effect on Americans' attitudes and behaviors when it comes to their own religiosity, but they became more likely to think the influence of religion in society is rising.

For the first time in Gallup's polling history, less than half of U.S. adults report belonging to a church, synagogue or mosque.

While Pope Francis' comments supporting same sex civil unions were a drastic shift in Catholic church guidance, U.S. Catholics have supported gay marriage for about a decade.

Several factors help explain why Americans are four times as likely to see polygamy as morally acceptable now compared with 14 years ago.

More Americans say religion is increasing its influence on American life, although there has been no uptick in individual religiosity.

New data show little evidence of major change in the percentage of Americans worshipping during the virus situation, although most now worship virtually.

The COVID-19 virus has disrupted traditional religious practices in the U.S. and may deepen spirituality among Americans as they confront the crisis.

Christmas is everywhere you turn during the holiday season, but is it for everyone?

Americans of all ages are now more likely to have no formal religion. This is strongest among millennials, though they grow more religious as they age.

Fifty years after Woodstock became the symbol of 1960s social upheaval, Gallup trends highlight how much has changed in U.S. society.

Declining confidence in organized religion likely reflects many factors, including clergy scandals and the religion-politics connection.