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Throughout the late Ross Perot's two presidential campaigns, U.S. voters had a mixed view of the business executive turned politician.

by V. Lance Tarrance

Newly elected Vice President Mike Pence may be in line to expand the duties and power of the office of vice president.

Gallup's Editor-in-Chief reports on eight things we learned from the American people during the presidential campaign of 2016.

To a remarkable degree, Americans -- now and in the past -- think about "emails" when asked what they have heard or read about Hillary Clinton.

Americans continue to be more likely to report having read, heard or seen something about Donald Trump than about Hillary Clinton. In recent days, 83% of Americans have heard something about Trump, 78% about Clinton.

A weekly update on Americans' recall of news about the two presidential candidates shows that Trump has clearly regained his position as more in the news than Clinton, fueled in large part by Americans' focus on his tax situation.

Americans' recall of having read, seen or heard anything about Clinton and Trump jumped to record levels after the first debate, but there has been little meaningful change in the two candidates' images.

Protestants are more likely to be positive about Trump than Clinton, while the reverse is true of Catholics, but these views differ significantly when these two groups are divided by race and ethnicity.