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Life Satisfaction

Explore Gallup's research.

An estimated 53.2% of U.S. adults rate their lives well enough to be categorized as "thriving," the lowest level measured since January 2021.

Black adults living in households with lower incomes report higher levels of wellbeing than do their White or Hispanic counterparts, but this fades in higher-income households.

Americans' satisfaction with a variety of aspects of U.S. life and public policy areas remains depressed from 2020, with many declining further since 2021.

Americans' satisfaction with the way things are going in the U.S. is at its lowest point in a year, 17%, but most, 85%, remain satisfied with their own lives.

An estimated 55.1% of U.S. adults rate their lives well enough to be classified as "thriving," down four points from the record high measured in June.

An estimated 59.2% of U.S. adults rate their lives well enough to be categorized as "thriving" exceeding the previous record-high estimate of 57.3% from 2017.

The overall life ratings of U.S. adults have risen to the highest point since October 2019, with 54.0% currently categorized as "thriving."

Eighty-two percent of Americans are satisfied with the way things are going in their personal life, a sharp drop from last year's record-high 90%.

Leaders can make a big difference in their workers' performance and lives when they connect employee engagement to holistic wellbeing.

The overall life ratings of Black Americans have eroded since 2016, but negative emotional experiences are unchanged in recent years.

A new analysis reveals that people who live in cities report higher levels of happiness than those in rural areas.

Remote workers can feel lonely and isolated, but it's not typical and it is preventable if leaders and managers focus on supporting their engagement.

Millennial job hopping doesn't have to be the new normal, but leaders need to make them want to stay.