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Not All Workers in Eastern Europe, FSU Happy With Work Hours

World

Not All Workers in Eastern Europe, FSU Happy With Work Hours

by Neli Esipova and Julie Ray
Not All Workers in Eastern Europe, FSU Happy With Work Hours

Story Highlights

  • At least half of full- or part-time workers want to keep same hours
  • Part-time workers five times as likely to want to work more hours
  • Full-time workers more than twice as likely to want to work fewer hours

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Last year, full-time workers across Eastern Europe and former Soviet states say they put in 45 hours at work each week, on average, and part-time workers put in 27. This is higher than average for many workers across Europe, and more in line with numbers the U.S.

For the most part, workers in Eastern Europe and former Soviet states are fine with this situation. The majority of workers who work full time for an employer would like to work the same number of hours they do now (62%), as would about half of part-time workers (48%).

Many in Eastern Europe, FSU Happy With Hours they Work
Among workers in Eastern Europe, former Soviet states
Employed full time Employed part time
% %
Prefer to work more hours 7 35
Prefer to work same hours 62 48
Prefer to work fewer hours 27 13
Do not want to work at all 2 2
Gallup World Poll 2017

Overall, more than four in 10 adults (42%) in the 29 countries surveyed in Eastern Europe and former Soviet states work either full or part time. But not all of these workers are content with their work hours.

Part-time workers (35%) are five times as likely as full-time workers (7%) to want to work more hours, which may reflect the growth in the number of part-time jobs and the decline in the number of full-time jobs throughout Europe since 2007. A number of these part-time workers may be in this situation involuntarily, working in jobs that often offer lower wages and poorer career opportunities.

At the same time, full-time workers may be slightly envious of their part-time counterparts -- or at the least be looking for more of a work-life balance. They are more than twice as likely as part-time workers to want to work fewer hours (27% vs. 13%).

Overall, workers living in the Eastern European countries that belong to the European Union (8%) are far less likely than those in former Soviet states (15%) or non-EU countries in Eastern Europe (19%) to want to work more hours -- but the EU also has a much larger percentage of full-time workers than the other two areas.

However, the common theme persists: Part-time workers in each of the three regions want to work more hours than they currently are, including the majority of part-time workers in non-EU countries (59%).

Gender Parity or Disparity?

While similar percentages of men and women in the 29 countries surveyed are working part time, women are less likely to be working full time for an employer (43% of men, 31% for women). They also typically work fewer hours each week than men, even if they are working full time for an employer.

Women working full time are clocking 43 hours compared with 46 hours for men. However, women tend to be slightly more satisfied with their current situation than men, and fewer women than men want to work more hours.

Women Slightly More Satisfied Than Men With Work Hours
Among adult workers in Eastern Europe and former Soviet states
Women, full time Men, full time Women, part time Men, part time
% % % %
Prefer to work more hours 5 10 33 38
Prefer to work same hours 64 61 48 49
Prefer to work fewer hours 28 26 15 11
Do not want to work at all 2 2 3 *
* = Less than 0.5%
Gallup World Poll 2017

Bottom Line

Jobs are a precious commodity to part-time and full-time workers in these 29 countries -- just 2% would rather not be working at all. While both groups are generally are fine with the hours they are putting in each week, a significant percentage of part-time workers feel they are clearly not at capacity and would like to be working more.

With involuntary part-time work rising the aftermath of the economic crisis, particularly in hard-hit countries in southern Europe, more people could find themselves in this situation, which raises even more questions about the future of work.

For complete methodology and specific survey dates, please review Gallup's Country Data Set details.

Learn more about how the Gallup World Poll works.

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Gallup https://news.gallup.com/poll/244586/not-workers-eastern-europe-fsu-happy-work-hours.aspx
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